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Protect These Three Parts of the Body from Ultraviolet Rays

Living in a country that gets sunshine for most of the year is a distinct advantage. However, there is a risk of health problems that lurk behind ultraviolet light exposure. There are three types of ultraviolet light based on short lengths and how these rays penetrate the skin. The first shortest type is UVC, absorbed completely by the atmosphere and will not reach the surface of the earth.

While UVB is a medium-sized ray that cannot penetrate deeper than the surface of the skin. Conversely, 95 percent of UVA reaches the earth and can penetrate the deeper layers of the skin. Now let's recognize the dangers of ultraviolet light to the health of the body and look at ways to minimize the risks that exist.

Protect These Three Parts of the Body from Ultraviolet Rays


Eye


Exposure to bright sunlight, especially those reflected in water can cause injury to the eyes. High-intensity ultraviolet rays can even cause temporary blindness. Eye infection is a condition that needs to be watched out because it can occur in eyes that are injured by ultraviolet light burning. In addition, exposure to UV light also risks causing the following conditions:

  • Photokeratitis or inflammation of the cornea, as well as photoconjunctivitis or inflammation of the conjunctiva (the lining inside the eyelids and eye socket). Although it can feel very painful, the two conditions above can be cured and generally do not cause chronic vision problems.
  • Cataract. This eye disease arises from the breakdown of proteins in the lens of the eye resulting in a buildup of pigments which eventually causes blindness. Along with aging, cataracts can worsen due to exposure to UVB rays. The good news is that cataracts can be cured with surgery.
  • Eye cancer. Research has found that some types of eye cancer can be linked to exposure to sunlight for a long time. One type of eye cancer that is dangerous is melanoma.
  • Pterygium. At the inner corner of the eye, fibrovascular tissue can form which leads to the center of the eye. This tissue growth is associated with UV exposure. Over time, this tissue can close the pupillary hole so that it disturbs vision. Pterygium can be treated with surgery, although it can grow back.

Skin


Ultraviolet light causes damage to elastin fibers on the skin so that stretchy facial skin cannot return to normal. This ultraviolet light can penetrate the deep inner skin layer where blood and connective tissue are located. Allegedly this premature aging occurs because UVA rays increase oxidative stress in cells. This is a condition where the amount of free radicals exceeds the body's ability to neutralize it.

Meanwhile, UVB actually stimulates the production of melanin and thicker epidermal production of skin cells. Therefore UVB actually helps the body fight damage caused by ultraviolet light. But high doses of UVB exposure can also cause burning skin which risks triggering the development of cancer.

Here are some skin conditions that can be caused by ultraviolet exposure:

  • Sunburn or burning skin. Too long sunbathing in the sun causes UV radiation to kill and damage cells on the surface of the skin layer. Burning skin can cause it to become reddish, called erythema. Although it can subside within a few days, this condition can make the skin blister and peel. The new skin that appears after that is actually more susceptible to UV exposure.
  • Wrinkle skin. Those who do not protect their skin from the start from this ray can experience premature skin aging.
  • Skin cancer (carcinoma and melanoma), and precancer (actinic keratosis).
  • Wounds on the skin due to decreased skin immune function.
  • Benign tumor.
  • The skin color changes, called speckled pigmentation.
  • The skin color turns faded to yellow.
  • Telangiectasia: dilation of small blood vessels under the skin.
  • Elastosis: the destruction of elastic tissue and collagen. The skin becomes easily sagging, wrinkled, and glistening.

The skin of certain people is more sensitive to UV. This condition is called photosensitivity, where even a small amount of UV can cause certain allergic reactions, such as a rash or skin that is severely burned. This condition is often associated with the consumption of certain drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, and antidepressants.

To deal with mild sunburn due to sunlight, pain relief such as ibuprofen and aspirin may help. Likewise, by bathing in cold water and drinking enough mineral water. Moisturizing creams, aloe vera, and one percent hydrocortisone can also be applied to help with recovery. Immediately consult a doctor if you experience burns, then accompanied by high fever, dehydration, and unbearable pain that does not subside for more than two days. While treatment can be given to people with melanoma, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.

Immune system


The UV radiation is thought to be absorbed by molecules near the skin which can affect the cell's response and the body's immune system against certain diseases. This condition makes sunbathing too long to cause UV radiation to kill and damage cells on the surface of the skin layer. Burning skin can cause it to become reddish, called erythema. Although it can subside within a few days, this condition can make the skin blister and peel. The new skin that appears after that is actually more susceptible to UV exposure.

Avoid the risk of UV light


For those of you who often move outdoors, exposure to UV rays from the sun means inevitable, Even so, there are simple ways that can be done so as not to be roasted by this light.

  • Apply a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, about 20 minutes before being exposed to UV light. The SPF shows how long you are protected from the sun after applying the cream. SPF 15 indicates that the sunscreen can protect users for up to 15 minutes. Keep in mind that the performance of sunscreens is also influenced by sweat, moisture, wind, and proper application. The following tips to get the maximum benefit from sunscreen.
  • Sunscreens that are 1-2 years old have lost their benefits so they don't need to be used again.
  • Sunscreen needs to be applied again every 2 hours or when you sweat a lot. Likewise when swimming.
  • After applying sunscreen to your feet and hands, don't forget to apply also the neck, back of your hands, lips, and ears.
  • Avoid applying sunscreen along with other ingredients, such as anti-mosquito lotions and lotions because they will not protect the skin.
  • In contrast to opinions in general, wearing darker and tighter clothes is more effective in protecting the skin from UV light than loose brightly colored clothes.
  • Use a hat and sunglasses that protect your eyes completely from UV light.

In a country on the equator, the sun shines most of the day. As a precautionary measure, at least we can avoid activities outside the room when the sun is very hot, for example at 12.00 to 14.00.
Title: Protect These Three Parts of the Body from Ultraviolet Rays | Written by: Body Health | Rating Blog: 5 out of 5

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